Nexcelom Bioscience

Archive for the ‘Cellometer User Publications’ Category

Cellometer assists in identification of PGRMC as a cancer stem cell marker and therapeutic target

Sara Barker | March 8, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

The University of Kentucky investigated progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), an often upregulated component in thyroid, breast, colon and lung tumors. PGRMC1 has been associated with drug resistance and is thought of as an indicator of prognosis. The researchers employed a variety of cell types to represent head and neck cancers, as well as oral, lung and ovarian cancers. These cells were exposed to PGRMC1 inhibitors. The Cellometer performed cell counts with Trypan Blue. The PGRMC1 inhibitors successfully prompted cancer stem cell death even when other anti-cancer agents did not. The researchers suggest using PGRMC1 as a cancer stem cell marker as well as a therapeutic target.

Read the full publication here.

Cellometer M10 studies evolutionarily-conserved proteins across species

Sara Barker | March 3, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

The Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology (Germany) investigated the evolutionarily-conserved proteins REIL 1 and 2 in A. thaliana and yeast cells. Research suggests these proteins are involved in the eukaryotic ribosomal 60S subunit. Here, investigators studied mutated REIL proteins in different species. The Cellometer Auto M10 analyzed cell size and concentration. The group discovered that these proteins are necessary to allow A. thaliana to grow in lower temperatures.

Read the full publication here. 

Cellometer Auto T4 investigates dysfunction to pro-inflammatory cytokine toxicity and reactive oxygen species

Sara Barker | March 1, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

The Institute of Clinical Biochemistry (Hanover, Germany) hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine environment seen in obese patients and those with obesity-related diabetes promotes the dysregulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT), which in turn intensifies diabetes progression. With a murine non-differentiated brown adipocyte cell line, researchers examined how exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines impacted these cells. Cell density calculations were performed on the Cellometer Auto T4. The pro-inflammatory cytokines negatively impacted the cells’ viability, markedly increased reactive oxygen species production, and down regulated markers specific to BAT such as UCP-1 and β-Klotho. The scientists concluded that pro-inflammatory cytokines lead to BAT death and dysfunction, as well as an increase in oxidative stress.

Read the full publication here. 

Cellometer Vision helps undergraduates explore immunophenotyping in mouse bone marrow stem cells

Sara Barker | February 25, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

A collaboration between Merrimack College (North Andover, MA) and Nexcelom Bioscience LLC used a Cellometer Vision in an undergraduate immunology classroom to explore differentiation, activation, cell surface marker expression and cytokine production in mouse bone marrow stem cells. The Cellometer Vision allowed the students to visualize and analyze their cells for various surface markers before designing experiments to explore the activity of natural anti-inflammatory compounds on TNF-alpha production.

Read the full publication here. 

More than 50% of Nexcelom employees hold advanced degrees – so it’s no surprise that we love collaborations with other scientists and institutions. Many of our academic customers have taken advantage of our Teaching Lab program – as a way to introduce their students to alternate methods for performing cell counts and cell-based assays. If you think the Teaching Lab might benefit your lab, reach out to us – we’d love to hear from you!

Cellometer assists in creation of reference database of 1,800 quantified yeast proteins

Sara Barker | February 23, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

Researchers at the University of Manchester (UK) created a reference database of 1,800 quantified S. cerevisiae proteins via specific isotope labeling and mass spectrometry. This is the largest database of its kind created to date, and the goal was to obtain a better understanding of intracellular protein concentrations, important information for those involved in molecular systems biology. The Cellometer was used to maintain accurate cell counts throughout experimentation. This database can now serve as a standard for the yeast proteome in all research going forward.

Read the full publication here. 

The Cellometer automated cell counters can provide many advantages in your lab. Learn more about how a Cellometer could be a great fit into your work!

Cellometer Vision is used to characterize fungi suitable for pest management

Sara Barker | February 18, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

Entomopathogenic fungi (ENPF)– those fungal species that use insect hosts to propagate – are of note in India due to their potential utility in pest management. The Indian Institute of Technology (New Delhi, India) obtained soil samples and isolated ENPF with the intention of studying how these types of fungi might be used to control the house fly, Musca domestica, an insect that causes many health problems in humans and animals in that country. The samples were then characterized molecularly and tested for pathogenicity against M. domestica. The Cellometer Vision was used to accurately maintain spore counts. Through this work, the researchers identified strains suitable to the given environment with high potency against the common house fly for further development.

Read the full publication here. 

The Cellometer Vision and Vision CBA systems provide researchers with great flexibility – the Vision system can be used for cell counting in bright field and also dual fluorescence, and can also perform cell-based assays with only 20 microliters of sample.

Cellometer helps to study microalgae metabolism for future industrial biotechnology applications

Sara Barker | February 16, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

Researchers at the University of Manchester (UK) investigated the metabolism of microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which holds great potential for future industrial biotechnology applications. This research uncovered that the typical lipid and starch accumulation by these microalgae during phosphorous starvation did not occur in the presence of mutant transcription factor PSR1. The Cellometer ensured accurate cell counts throughout experimentation. This work reports that PSR1 has significant control over the global metabolism of these cells, and that knowledge is of great importance to those who plan to develop microalgae to one-day produce pharmaceuticals, foods, and energy.

Read the full publication here. 

Cellometer T4 supports research into the chemoprotective effects of aspirin in a variety of cancer cell lines

Sara Barker | February 9, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

South Dakota State researchers investigated the role aspirin and its primary metabolite salicylic acid play as chemoprotective agents via the inhibition of cell cycle regulators cyclin A2 and CDK2. Using a variety of human cancer cell lines (HCT 116, HT-29, SW480, SK-MEL-28, SK-MEL-5, MDA-MB-231, MCF7, NCI-H226, OVCAR-3, PC-3, and B16-F10), the scientists investigated the effects the drugs had on cyclin A2 and CDK2 levels and activity. Floating and trypsinized cells were collected and analyzed for viability with Trypan Blue and the Cellometer Auto T4. In all the cell lines examined, aspirin and salicylic acid down regulated cyclin A2 and CDK2 activity, thereby providing a novel target for the chemoprevention of various cancers.

Read the full publication here. 

Cellometer Auto 2000 assists in developing new method to isolate and expand umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stromal cells

Sara Barker | February 4, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

Kansas State University scientists developed a new method by which to isolate and expand umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCMSCs). Rather than dissecting blood vessels, this method uses a dissociator followed by enzymatic digestion. This reduces contamination and hands-on time and produces ten times more cells per cm of tissue than other processes. The Cellometer Auto 2000 and AO/PI were used to count live cells and record cell size. The scientists validated the cells obtained from this method, demonstrating the cells’ expression of the standard surface markers CD90, CD105, CD73, CD44, as well as their pluripotent differentiation potential. UCMSCs have significant immunomodulatory potential, making them the focus of many clinical studies each year. It is hoped that improved collection methods, such as this one, will only expand the use of this therapeutically important cells.

Read the full publication here. 

The Cellometer Auto 2000 is a versatile all-in-one, stand alone instrument that provides dual fluorescent imaging capabilities, optimized for primary cell samples. Learn more about how the Auto 2000 could benefit your research!

Cellometer Vision participates in study to evaluate effects of lead nitrate on human leukemia cells

Sara Barker | January 28, 2016 | No Comments | Cellometer User Publications

At the NIH-Center for Environmental Health (Jackson, MS), a study was designed to analyze the impacts of lead nitrate, a component that has been greatly reduced in paint and ceramic products, and yet its exposure levels in humans remain a concern. Because industrial sources of lead persist in our environment, these researchers evaluated its effects on the DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis in human leukemia cells (HL-60). The Cellometer Vision was used to measure live and necrotic cells with propidium iodide. After exposure to lead nitrate, the cells showed significant increases in necrotic death, DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. The results reported here provide new evidence of lead-based mechanisms of cellular damage and its downstream effects on human health.

Read the full publication here.