Cellometer on Tap – Yeast Cell Counting for Breweries

How many brewers does it take to count yeast? This sounds like the beginning of a bad joke. In truth, cell counting is really simple but labor intensive & extremely time-consuming. With a Nexcelom Cellometer X2 – it only takes one click & 30 seconds per sample! Cellometer has earned a reputation as the “go to” cell counter for breweries seeking accurate yeast counts, viability & vitality. Just look at the map comparing the distribution of Nexcelom’s Cellometer automated yeast counters and the Top 50 breweries in the US. Data based on beer sales volume adapted from Brewery Association (BA) [...]

High throughput, high-resolution image acquisition for DNA damage detection

Celigo playing an important role in high throughput, high-resolution image acquisition for DNA damage detection. The Celigo S captures 16 images of each well that are then stitched into a single representation Open access article: Next generation high throughput DNA damage detection platform for genotoxic compound screening

By | 2018-06-15T15:35:51+00:00 March 2nd, 2018|Categories: Celigo Application News, Latest News|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Don’t let clumpy samples prevent you from getting an accurate count!

Counting cells with a hemacytometer is a long, dull process on its own – but if you’re trying to count cells that are clumped together in your sample, it can become a real headache! Clumpy samples make it hard to discern the individual cells from one another, causing a high risk of human error and skewed cell counts. Your results can be extremely difficult to reproduce, as the cell count would likely vary from person to person counting the same clumpy sample, causing a lack of confidence in your data.  Luckily, we have a solution. The Cellometer Auto T4 automated [...]

Cellometer T4 supports research into the chemoprotective effects of aspirin in a variety of cancer cell lines

South Dakota State researchers investigated the role aspirin and its primary metabolite salicylic acid play as chemoprotective agents via the inhibition of cell cycle regulators cyclin A2 and CDK2. Using a variety of human cancer cell lines (HCT 116, HT-29, SW480, SK-MEL-28, SK-MEL-5, MDA-MB-231, MCF7, NCI-H226, OVCAR-3, PC-3, and B16-F10), the scientists investigated the effects the drugs had on cyclin A2 and CDK2 levels and activity. Floating and trypsinized cells were collected and analyzed for viability with Trypan Blue and the Cellometer Auto T4. In all the cell lines examined, aspirin and salicylic acid down regulated cyclin A2 and CDK2 [...]

Cellometer Auto 2000 participates in new method for manufacturing human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells on an industrial scale

Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine. Kansas State University researchers investigated the growth parameters necessary to propagate hMSCs on a larger scale, moving from static cultures to the scope of stirred bioreactor tanks. Now that this group has optimized a new method by which to isolate and expand these hMSCs (please see companion paper by this group), the next challenge was producing enough cells to satisfy future clinical needs. The researchers investigated the growth kinetics and metabolic needs of these cells as the propagation scope increased. The Cellometer Auto 2000 recorded cell viability, size, and [...]

Cellometer T4 studies immune response to Delftia bacteria sometimes found in IV catheters

North Carolina State University investigated the immune response to the gram-negative bacteria Delftia spp., a water and soil species which has been identified in IV catheters. Delftia strain Cs1-4 and THP-1 cells (monocytes) were employed. Cellometer Auto T4 provided cell viability measurements with Trypan Blue to ensure a constant concentration of viable monocytes were present throughout experimentation. After Delftia stimulation of the monocytes, monocyte mortality rose, as did the production of TNF and pro-inflammatory proteins. This research confirms that Delftia does induce a pro-inflammatory reaction in monocytes and suggests that more research into the downstream effects of this bacteremia-associated strain [...]

Cellometer Auto T4 evaluates the cytotoxic potential of mouth rinses

How safe is your mouthwash? Researchers in Germany worked to answer that question. University of Leipzig (Germany) researchers investigated the cytotoxic effects of different antimicrobial mouth rinses (MRs) on gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Although effective at killing infectious agents, most MRs have some cytotoxic impact on host tissue, which could delay the healing process the rinses are meant to enable. Human primary gingiva fibroblasts and human primary nasal epithelial cells were exposed to various MRs (Octenidol (OCT), Chlorhexidine 0.2% (CHX), Listerine (LIS), Meridol (MER), Betaisodona (BET), and control) for varying lengths of time. The Cellometer Auto T4 analyzed cell [...]

Cellometer Auto T4 is used to uncover novel targets for Graves’ Orbitopathy therapeutics

Researchers at Cardiff University and First Affiliated Hospital of Fourth Military Medical University of Shaanxi, China investigated the mechanisms by which excessive adipogenesis and extracellular matrix production, namely in the form of hyaluronan acid (HA), expand orbital contents in Graves’ Orbitopathy (GO) patients. Currently, GO patients are treated with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies that are largely ineffective. This study examined FOXOs and how their involvement in the PI3K pathway might be studied in order to uncover non-immunosuppressive therapy targets. Preadipocytes/fibroblasts (PFs) were used to study the outcomes when FOXO expression was enhanced and inhibited. The Cellometer Auto T4 and Trypan [...]

By | 2015-12-03T10:00:31+00:00 December 3rd, 2015|Categories: Cellometer User Publications|Tags: , , |0 Comments

French Institute for Health and Medical Research and the University of Lyon use Cellometer Auto T4 for Trypan Blue Viability

Here’s another great example of how researchers across the world are using the Cellometer instruments before performing their downstream assays: Researchers at the French Institute for Health and Medical Research and the University of Lyon investigated the effects of ultrasound on sonoporation (increasing a cell’s permeability in order to transfer molecules or genetic material into the cells). Using adherent HT-29 cells, as well as the Cellometer Auto T4 and trypan blue, researchers evaluated the cells’ viability 24 hours prior to sonication studies. Varying the acoustic intensities and cavitation regulation allowed them to optimize sonoporation efficiency, regardless of ambient temperature. The [...]

By | 2015-11-06T10:16:04+00:00 November 6th, 2015|Categories: Cellometer User Publications|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Rowan Univ Researchers using Cellometer Vision for PI Viability, Caspase-3 activation and ROS

The Cellometer instruments have a wide range of functionality – this publication demonstrates how an instrument such as the Cellometer Vision can be used for more than just viability and can perform many cell-based assays. Fructose differs from glucose in that it is not regulated by a negative feedback loop and can thereby negatively impact intracellular energy stores. As the incidence of diabetes and obesity have risen in this country, so has the intake of fructose, making fructose’s effects on pancreatic cells important to understand. Here, researchers at Rowan University revealed that fructose sensitizes pancreatic beta cells to TNF-a-induced toxicity. [...]

By | 2015-11-04T10:15:35+00:00 November 4th, 2015|Categories: Cellometer User Publications|Tags: , , |0 Comments